: Learning GNU Emacs, 3rd Edition

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8.3.1.1.2 Using the C-x 8 prefix 240
Chapter3.Search and Replace 240
Preface 226
Chapter1.Emacs Basics 213
Chapter2.Editing 195
8.4.3 Writing XHTML Using nxml Mode 191
Colophon 179
Chapter11.Emacs Lisp Programming 179
3.1 Different Kinds of Searches 176
Chapter5.Emacs as a Work Environment 170
9.2.4 etags 166
Chapter10.Customizing Emacs 166
Chapter13.Platform-Specific Considerations 164
9.3.3 Additional C and C++ Mode Features 163
Chapter9.Computer Language Support 161
3.3.4 Spellchecking on the Fly with Flyspell 160
7.6.1 Drawing in Picture Mode 160
AppendixB.Emacs Lisp Packages 159
7.2.4 Changing Margins 158
7.5 Rectangle Editing 158
1.4 Starting Emacs 158
10.1.6 A Dired Example 157
7.6.3 Drawing with the Mouse Using Artist 157
AppendixD.Online Resources 156
8.3.2.2 A brief tour of HTML helper mode 155
Keystroke Notation 153
GNU Emacs and the Free Software Foundation 152
AppendixA.Emacs Variables 152
2.1.1 Other Ways to Move the Cursor 152
Chapter14.The Help System 152
TableB-1.Support for Java, C, and C++ programming 149
2.4 Emacs and the Clipboard 147
Chapter6.Writing Macros 147
11.2.2 Control Structures 145
12.8.2 Difference Reports 145
3.4.2 Word Abbreviation Mode 144
AppendixE.Quick Reference 143
11.3.3 A Treasure Trove of Examples 143
2.3.3 Selecting and Pasting 143
10.1.3 Customizing with Custom 142
11.3.5 Finding Other Built-in Functions 142
4.2.1 Switching Buffers 142
1.1 Introducing Emacs! 142
TableA-1.Backups, auto-save, and versioning 141
3.2.5 Are Emacs Searches Case-Sensitive? 141
8.3.2.7 Character encoding in HTML helper mode 141
12.8.6 Inserting Version Control Headers 140
1.7.4 How Emacs Chooses a Default Directory 140
9.5 The Java Development Environment for Emacs (JDEE) 140
TableE-11.Shell mode commands 140
Chapter4.Using Buffers, Windows, and Frames 140

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